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Little Italy San Diego

San Diego. California's Italian American Neighborhood

San Diego's Little Italy is an evolving inner-city neighborhood that is a great place to live, shop, dine and visit.

Little Itally offers bay views, art and cultural festivities and fine food. There are nearby San Diego hotels and vacation rentals.

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Little Italy street signThe Little Italy street sign, erected in 1999, on India Street between Date and Fir identifies the neighborhood that serves as the heart and soul of San Diego's Italian American community.
More than a half-dozen annual festivals are hosted in Little Italy each year including celebrations of holidays, music and art including Carnivale (Mardi Gras), "Chalk La Strada," Columbus Day Festa, ArtWalk, a Bocce Ball Tournament, and Easter celebrations.
Outdoor cafe on India St. in Little ItalyIndia Street is the heart of the neighborhood with outdoor cafes, restaurants, galleries and speciality shops. Amici Park provides a playground for Washington Elementary School and a community park complete with bocce ball court.
Larger than the Little Italy neighborhoods in San Francisco, St. Louis or New York — this San Diego historic waterfront district is making a comeback after years of setbacks.

Little Italy San Diego History

Little Itally street sceneItalians, primarily from Genoa, Italy and Sicily were drawn to California by the climate and the geographical similarity to their homeland.
Those who came to San Diego tended to form homogeneous communities like other immigrants did in many cities throughout the U.S. Quite a few of the earliest arrivals adopted the area around Kettner Boulevard , India, Columbia and State Streets as their new home.
La Jolla Bike and Kayak, Birch Aquarium at Scripps, Whale Watching, Gaslamp Walking Tour, Coronado Historic Walking Tour, admission to a dozen unique museums in Balboa Park as well as San Diego Zoo Best Value Ticket, San Diego Wild Animal Park, much more plus discounts on shopping and dining and a full color San Diego Guidebook all for one low price.
Go San Diego CardGo San Diego Card details and purchase
Bocce ball court at Amici ParkMany of the new arrivals had previously made their livelihood from fishing in Italy and it was natural for this industry to become their focus in their new country.
A natural harbor and year round Mediterranean climate eventually resulted in San Diego becoming the home base for the pacific coast tuna fishing fleet.
Amici Park sculptureItalian immigrants who didn't own or work on fishing boats often started seafood processing plants, seafood marketing businesses or Italian restaurants specializing in seafood. More than 40,000 people were employed directly or indirectly by the tuna industry in San Diego by the late seventies.
The nearby Maritime Museum San Diego is a place to learn more about San Diego's seafaring experience.
Courtyard in Little ItalySeveral events in U.S. and San Diego history had negative impacts on Italian fishermen including the U.S. involvement in WWII and then later, in the early 1950's, stiff competition from a revitalized Japanese fishing fleet and foreign control of bait resources and costal waters south of the U.S.
Victorian houses in Little ItalyDuring WWII the tuna boats range was restricted, larger boats were requisitioned by the Navy and Italian residents legal status changed when ever they left the territorial limits of the U.S. — including while on a fishing boat. By 1959 the tuna clipper fleet shrank from 210 to 149 vessels.
In addition to the decline in the tuna industry San Diego's Little Italy neighborhood was literally cut in two by construction of Interstate 5 displacing many families to other parts of the city. Fortunately for San Diego many of the displaced families maintain businesses in Little Italy and return there to shop and worship.
Our lady of the Rosary ChurchOur Lady of the Rosary Church, an Italian National Parish at 1659 Columbia Street, was consecrated on November 15, 1925. The Parish Hall next to the Church was inaugurated in 1939.
Fausto Tasca decorated the ceiling and the walls of Our Lady of the Rosary Church with paintings depicting the mysteries of the Rosary, the twelve Apostles, a huge Crucifixion, and the Last Judgment. There are also statues of Our Lady, St. Anne, and St. Joseph by the famous Californian Sculptor Carlos Romanelli and several beautiful stained glass windows in the church.
Italian Community CenterThe Italian Cultural Center promotes, celebrates and provides education about Italian American culture.
The Little Italy Association maintains a website with information about the neighborhood.
The Pioneer Hook & Ladder Firehouse Museum at 1572 Columbia Street in Little Italy displays 150 years of firefighting history from around the world. Housed in the historic 1906 San Diego Fire Station 6 building firefighting equipment , photographs and memorabilia give visitors a look into the past. Admission to The Firehouse Museum, as well as many other San Diego museums, attractions and tours, is included with the Go San Diego Card.

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Website and all photos copyright © 2001–2014 Lee W. Nelson